Me and she and him and I

Here’s an easy one: Which of these two sentences would you use?

I went downtown.
Me went downtown.

OK, here’s another pair:

He went downtown.
Him went downtown.

Both of those are no-brainers, right? Now, what if you put both people into the same sentence? It’s still a no-brainer. You simply merge the two correct sentences: “He and I went downtown.” (You let the other person go first, of course, because that’s the polite thing to do.)

Let’s try another example:

The company addressed the package to me.
The company addressed the package to I.

Now the second pair:

The company addressed the package to her.
The company addressed the package to she.

Again, two easy choices. And it’s just as easy to put both people into the same sentence: “The company addressed the package to her and me.” Not “her and I,” and not “me and she.”

You can do this with any pairing of I, me, she, her, he, him, they and them. Use the same words in a pair that you would use if each were in a sentence by itself. This trick also works when you use real names, such as Bill and I, or the Amalgamated Widget Polishers and me.

Notice how we didn’t have to get into all those confusing labels about compound subjects and objects and third-person plurals? You’re welcome.

 

 

 

 

 

 


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